By Darryl Alder
Jan 01, 2017

2017 Internal/External Analysis

Utah National Parks SWOT Analysis

STRENGTHS

  • Scouting programs helps leaders “Be With Them“—our outdoor programs concentrate the quality of that time.
  • A Scout’s duty to God “Connects Them With Heaven.” We help youth become spiritually prepared by developing testimonies of Christ and the gospel by their duty to God.
  • Scouting prepares boys to lead; the patrol method “Lets Them Lead” their own quorums.
  • The Daily Good Turn helps youth be prepared through personal growth and learning to serve others through charity.
  • Our quality youth-led activities helps prepare them to serve missions and teach others.
  • We have a proven program that develops individuals by doing hard things—building confidence and leadership skills
  • Our programs prepare young men to be good fathers and husbands through the examples of thier leaders who will “Be With Them.”
  • We help boys to be prepared by learning who they are as Scouts and sons of God.
  • The respected “Boy Scouts of America” brand.

FrameWEAKNESSES

  • Ineffective  and untimely communications with stake presidents and bishops.
  • Leaders aren’t as committed as they might be because they did not volunteer to serve.
  • Varsity Scout and Venturing underused leading to poor program delivery for older youth.
  • Contributions (FOS) are not well understood; many leaders don’t see the value of donations made.
  • Little transparency into financials. Where does money from Friends of Scouting go?
  • Too much paperwork and bureaucracy.
  • Lack of online services for parents and leaders to track their Scout’s progress.
  • Leader training is too long, inaccessible, not pertinent to LDS Scouting positions.
  • Expensive uniforms, badges, awards, camps, etc.
  • Sole reliance of Friends of Scouting campaigns to operate the council annually.
  • Perception that BSA executives have large salaries while volunteers do the work.
  • Imperfect alignment with Church organizations—too much demand to organize the BSA way.
  • Inadequate use of technology
  • Weak capital campaigns, leading to inadequate and poorly maintained camps and other facilities.

FrameOPPORTUNITIES

  • More timely and effective communication with LDS church leaders, boys, and parents.
  • Better communication about calendar of events and other activities.
  • Quality activities, led by youth
  • Involve dynamic leaders to drive interest and engagement with older youth.
  • Motivate leaders to attend training and become involved in Scouting—own the program
  • Show benefits to the entire family as well as, local Scouts.
  • Increased parental involvement to help their child advance in Scouting by working together in the home.
  • Access to clear, concise, simplified training in a variety of formats (ie. self paced reading, online, coaching, and small group training adapted for stakes.
  • Help bishops, stake presidents and others know how FOS is benefiting their Scouts.
  • Make uniforms, awards, badges, etc. more affordable for families.
  • An inspired program, compatible for use with Come Follow, Me monthly themes, Church Duty to God program, high moral values and adventure in the outdoors.
  • Challenge and adventure in outdoor experiences applying Scouting’s methods.

FrameTHREATS

  • Lack of quick and effective communication with stake presidents and bishops.
  • Not aligned with stakeholders—stake presidents and bishops, as well as LDS Church organizations and quorums.
  • Activities planned and let by adult leaders.
  • Parents do not have information they need (event calendaring, advancement tracking).
  • Lingering misunderstandings about BSA, especially media misperceptions and stories
  • When dynamic leaders move, their knowledge and experience leave with them, leaving a vacuum in youth programs
  • Slow response to technological advances.
  • Rising cost of Scouting.
  • Lack of church sponsored senior LDS priesthood leadership training in use of Scouting.
  • Large growth, especially in the younger aged groups, is outpacing our capacity to serve youth and camps and other activities.
  • Reliance of Friends of Scouting and camp income as major income sources.
  • Same sex and transgender issues in Scouting.
  • Competition from youth sports
  • Complex, time demanding training courses.
  • Misunderstanding about how to use Come Follow, Me monthly themes, Preach My Gospel, the Church’s Duty to God program with Scouting.

 

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