By Darryl Alder
Jan 26, 2017

Varsity Scout Leaders Day Book Day 15: Scouting Ideals

 picture1The Task: Use this pause in the action to consider the values that we have the boys recite in the Scout Oath and Law, the Motto and Slogan. Consider how well you believe these values and how well your actions embody them.


The ideals of Scouting are listed clearly in the Scout Oath and Law, the motto, and the slogan. These “ideals of Scouting” are used by all families of Scouting from Venturing to Cub Scouting. They are the focus of BSA’s mission, which reads:

The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law.

Knowing that every Varsity Scout should measure himself against these ideals and continually try to improve on them gives you, the Coach, pause to look at these values in your own life:

Scout Oath Scout Law
On my honor I will do my best
To do my duty to God and my country
and to obey the Scout Law;
To help other people at all times;
To keep myself physically strong,
mentally awake, and morally straight.
A Scout is:

Trustworthy
Loyal
Helpful
Friendly
Courteous
Kind
Obedient
Cheerful
Thrifty
Brave
Clean
Reverent

The goals are high. But, as you and your team reach for them, your youth will start to take control of what they will  become. Reviewing these with a Varsity Scout, in the regular Coach conference, helps the boy focus on his own character and growth.

By design, the Methods of Scouting are intended to bring character, citizenship and fitness into a boy’s life in ways that transfer into adulthood. For example, let’s consider citizenship.

In regular recitation of the Oath and Law, citizenship is usually approached from a patriotism and a civics point of view. But in the Coach’s conference before a Board of Review, the leader can explore service and stewardship, both of which are important aspects of citizenship. Similarly, during that conference, elements of character and fitness can be can be used to help instill all the values of the Oath and Law into a Scout’s life.

How are you going to help your team know and live by Scouting’s ideals?


You can read other parts of this blog series here:

Week 1 Week 2
Week 3
  • Day 15: Scouting Values
  • Day 16: Adult Jobs and Duties
  • Day 17: Adult and Youth Training
  • Day 18: Trip Plans and Insurance
  • Day 19: Youth Planning and Execution
  • Day 20: Balancing the 5 Areas
  • Day 21: Planning vs Activities

The month ahead:MOnth one

ADarryl head BWuthor: Darryl Alder | Strategic Initiatives Director, Utah National Parks Council, BSA. He was a Team Coach for three years during the pre-pilot phase of Varsity Scouting and then became a Varsity Scout trainer when the program launched.

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